Cheryl Kirby Artworks at Sutherland Library

The guest artist at Sutherland Library during July and August is Cheryl Kirby.
Cheryl is a longtime resident of Sutherland Shire. After leaving school at 15 Cheryl's first job was as an airbrush artist at the Empire Art Company in Darlinghurst. Part of her job was to attend East Sydney Technical College Art School, something that she really loved.

Cheryl's later career saw her move into commercial advertising in magazines and newspapers.  She took a break from paid work to raise a family but continued to study art part time at the School of Fashion and Art at Gymea Technical College. Cheryl also ran a small business designing and printing from home. Cheryl joined Friends of Hazelhurst in 2014.

Come to Sutherland Library and see a selection of acrylics, graphite and water colour pencil works by this very talented local artist.

Did you miss the headline when...?


....the Snowy Hydro Scheme was finished on 20 October 1974





 or when Australia's first female Prime Minister was sworn in on 25 June 2010

 1955 - 1995
and

2006 - today

are completely digitized copies of the Sydney Morning Herald,  enabling you to read the full story, today, at your library.

Read the news on the day you were born. Search the personal notices, jobs and the Shipping News.
Find out what we were, watching on television, wearing, seeing at the movies on any particular day.

 Sydney Morning Herald Archives and Library Edition, available at your library.








July Reads...

My grandmother sends her regards and apologises / Fredrik Backman ; translated from the Swedish by Henning Koch
Everyone remembers the stories their grandmother told them.

But does everyone remember their grandmother flirting with policemen? Driving illegally?

Breaking into a zoo in the middle of the night? Firing a paintball gun from a balcony in her dressing gown?

Seven-year-old Elsa does.

Some might call Elsa's granny 'eccentric', or even 'crazy'. Elsa calls her a superhero. And granny's stories, of knights and princesses and dragons and castles, are her superpower. Because, as Elsa is starting to learn, heroes and villains don't always exist in imaginary kingdoms; they could live just down the hallway.

As Christmas draws near, even the best superhero grandmothers may have one or two things they'd like to apologise for. And, in the process, Elsa can have some breath-taking adventures of her own . . .


Circling the sun by Paula McLain
Paula McLain, author of the phenomenal bestseller The Paris Wife, now returns with her keenly anticipated new novel, transporting readers to colonial Kenya in the 1920s.

Brought to Kenya from England as a child and then abandoned by her mother, Beryl is raised by both her father and the native Kipsigis tribe who share his estate. Her unconventional upbringing transforms Beryl into a bold young woman with a fierce love of all things wild and an inherent understanding of nature’s delicate balance. But even the wild child must grow up, and when everything Beryl knows and trusts dissolves, she is catapulted into a string of disastrous relationships.

Spirits of the Ghan by Judy Nunn
It is 2001 and as the world charges into the new Millennium, a century-old dream is about to be realised in the Red Centre of Australia: the completion of the mighty Ghan railway, a long-lived vision to create the 'backbone of the continent', a line that will finally link Adelaide with the Top End.

But construction of the final leg between Alice Springs and Darwin will not be without its complications, for much of the desert it will cross is Aboriginal land.

Hired as a negotiator, Jessica Manning must walk a delicate line to reassure the Elders their sacred sites will be protected. Will her innate understanding of the spiritual landscape, rooted in her own Arunta Heritage, win their trust? It's not easy to keep the peace when Matthew Witherton and his survey team are quite literally blasting a rail corridor through the timeless land of the Never-Never.

When the paths of Jessica and Matthew finally cross, their respective cultures collide to reveal a mystery that demands attention. As they struggle against time to solve the puzzle, an ancient wrong is awakened and calls hauntingly across the vastness of the outback . . .


Those girls by Chevy Stevens
They wanted him gone . . . Then it was their turn to disappear.

The three Campbell sisters, Dani, Courtney and Jess, had always dreamed of a day when their dead-beat alcoholic father would disappear . . . But when their dream becomes a reality, the consequences are more frightening than they ever imagined. Assuming new identities, they have to permanently forget the past.

Eighteen years later, Jess, who now goes by the name Jamie, is faced with a serious problem. Her own teenage daughter is asking too many questions; to answer them will involve her unveiling long-buried secrets about her youth, truths she has spent so long trying to forget. Because why did they all run away that night? And what really happened to their father?

Will those girls ever be able to leave the past behind or is it doomed to haunt them for ever?


All the little pieces by Jilliane Hoffman
She could have stopped an awful crime. She could have saved a life. She tried to forget about it. But now, the truth is out.

Faith Saunders is the perfect wife, mother and sister – loved and admired by all who know her. One night will change everything.As she drives home in the pouring rain, a dishevelled young woman appears out of nowhere, pleading for help. The isolated stretch of road is dark, and with her four-year-old daughter Maggie asleep in the backseat, Faith refuses to let the stranger in. What she sees next will haunt her forever.When the missing-person posters go up, Faith's guilt consumes her. Then the girl's body turns up, and her perfect life begins to unravel. Because it turns out Maggie wasn't asleep that night and – unlike her mother – she's not afraid to speak up.Maggie's testimony leads to an arrest, but Faith is the only one who can identify a second man who was at the scene of the crime. She has one chance to convince a jury of what happened. If she fails, two murderers will go free – two men who have killed before and who will undoubtedly kill again.And they know exactly where to find Faith and her family…

 I saw a man by Owen Sheers
An utterly stunning novel of love, loss, the insidious nature of secrets, and the transformative power of words. I Saw a Man fulfills the promise of Owen Sheers’s acclaimed novel, Resistance.

When journalist Caroline Marshall dies while on assignment in Pakistan, her grief-stricken husband, Michael, leaves their cottage in Wales and returns to London. He quickly develops a friendship with his neighbors, Josh and Samantha Nelson, and their two young daughters. Michael’s becoming close with the family marks the beginning of a long healing process.

But Michael’s period of recovery comes to an abrupt end when a terrible accident brings the burden of a shattering secret into his life. How will Michael bear the agonizing weight of guilt as he navigates persistent doubts on the path to attempted redemption? The answer, revealed poignantly in Sheers’ masterly prose, is eloquent, resonant, and completely unforgettable.

The turning point by Freya North
The unputdownable, tear-jerking new novel from Freya North.

Over one short weekend, when Canadian musician Scott Emerson and British children's author Frankie Shaw meet by chance, a profound connection is made. Their homes are thousands of miles apart: Frankie and her children live by the coast of North Norfolk while Scott's roots lie deep in the mountains of British Columbia. Against all advice, they decide to see where this might go. Over oceans and time zones, they make sacrifices and take risks, discovering along the way new truths about love and family. For the first time in a long while, it seems life could be very good. But fate has a tragic twist in store, one that could destroy all that was hoped for. Poignant, engrossing and moving, The Turning Point is a novel about the importance of seizing happiness and trusting that love will always find a way.


The truth according to us by Annie Barrows
Quirky, loveable, and above all human, this novel of small-town life in the 1930s is an immersive experience that will leave readers reeling and wanting more.

In the summer of 1938, Layla Beck is forced out of the lap of luxury and sent by her Senator father to work on the Federal Writers' Project, a New Deal jobs program. Assigned to cover the history of the little mill town of Macedonia, West Virginia, Layla envisions a summer of tedium.
However, once she secures a room in the home of the unconventional Romeyn family, she is completely drawn into their complex world.
At the Romeyn house, twelve-year-old Willa is desperate to acquire her favourite virtues of ferocity and devotion, but her search leads her into a thicket of mysteries, including the questionable business that occupies her charismatic father and the reason her adored aunt Jottie remains unmarried.
Layla's arrival strikes a match to the family's veneer, bringing to light buried secrets that will tell a new tale about the Romeyns and their deep entanglement in Macedonia's history. As Willa peels back the layers of her family's past, and Layla delves deeper into town legend, everyone involved is transformed – and their personal histories completely rewritten.

Orient  by Christopher Bollen
Suspenseful and haunting, Bollen's thrilling novel Orient is a provocative take on the troubled American dream, in the vein of Lionel Shriver or AM Homes.

At the eastern edge of Long Island, far from the hustle of New York City, stands Orient, a village that has been home to a few families for hundreds of years and is now - reluctantly - opening up to wealthy weekenders and artists from the city.
On the last day of summer, a young man with a hazy past appears, and not long after comes a series of events that shatters the peace in this isolated community. A strange, twisted creature washes ashore on the Sound and then a human corpse is found floating in the water. A woman dies in bizarre circumstances and a house fire erupts out of nowhere. Fear and suspicion mount until everyone's secrets threaten to be exposed. But who is Mills Chevern? What is his real name and why is he here? As all eyes shift towards the orphan drifter, Mills elicits the support of Beth Shepherd, an Orient native who is hiding a secret of her own.

The Beast's garden by Kate Forsyth
A retelling of the Grimms' Beauty and The Beast, set in Nazi Germany.

It's August 1939 in Germany, and Ava's world is in turmoil. To save her father, she must marry a young Nazi officer, Leo von Löwenstein, who works for Hitler's spy chief in Berlin. However, she hates and fears the brutal Nazi regime, and finds herself compelled to stand against it.
Ava joins an underground resistance movement that seeks to help victims survive the horrors of the German war machine. But she must live a double life, hiding her true feelings from her husband, even as she falls in love with him.
Gradually she comes to realise that Leo is part of a dangerous conspiracy to assassinate Hitler. As Berlin is bombed into ruins, the Gestapo ruthlessly hunt down all resistance and Ava finds herself living hand-to-mouth in the rubble of the shell-shocked city. Both her life and Leo's hang in the balance.

Incredible tales of rock and roll survival...


My appetite for destruction : sex & drugs & Guns N' Roses / Steven Adler with Lawrence J. Spagnola
No secret is too dark.
No revelation too sick. But you must have the appetite for it.
After forty years, twenty-eight ODs, three botched suicides, two heart attacks, a couple of jail stints, and a debilitating stroke, Steven Adler, the most self-destructive rock star ever, is ready to share the shattering untold truth in My Appetite for Destruction.

When Adler was eleven years old he told his two closest friends he was going to be a rock star in the world's greatest band. Along with four uniquely talented—but very complicated and demanding—musicians, Adler helped form Guns N' Roses. They rose from the streets—primal rockers who obliterated glam rock and its big hair to resurrect rock's truer blues roots.

From original Guns N' Roses drummer Steven Adler comes the inside story of Guns N' Roses through a new perspective and his own intense struggle with addiction, including the financial ruin he faced after being kicked out of Guns N' Roses and the health problems that almost claimed his life several times - two heart attacks, a suicide attempt, and a debilitating stroke.


The Rolling Stones: 50 / Mick Jagger
On Thursday 12 July 1962 the Rolling Stones went on stage at the Marquee Club in London’s Oxford Street. In the intervening fifty years the Stones have performed live in front of more people than any band … ever. They’ve played the smallest blues clubs and some of the biggest stadium tours of all time. They’ve had No.1 singles and albums in every country that has a popular music chart and have helped define popular culture. A phenomenal half-century later, they now look back at their astounding career.

Curated, introduced and narrated by the band themselves, 'The Rolling Stones 50' is the only officially authorized book to celebrate this milestone. With privileged access to a wealth of unseen and rare material, it is packed with superb reportage photography, contact sheets, negative strips, outtakes and so much more, from every period in the band’s history.

With more than 1,000 illustrations, it also features some of the most rare and interesting Stones memorabilia in existence: international posters, draft record cover art, bubblegum cards, jigsaws and other previously unpublished treasures specially photographed for this volume.

I am Ozzy / Ozzy Osbourne ; with Chris Ayres
People ask me how come I'm still alive, and I don't know what to say. When I was growing up, if you'd have put me up against a wall with the other kids from my street and asked me which one of us was gonna make it to the age of sixty, with five kids and four grandkids and houses in Buckinghamshire and California, I wouldn't have put money on me, no way. But here I am: ready to tell my story, in my own words, for the first time.

A lot of it ain't gonna be pretty. I've done some bad things in my time. But I ain't the devil. I'm just John Osbourne: a working class kid from Aston, who quit his job in the factory and went looking for a good time.

How to make Gravy/ Paul Kelly
This extraordinary book had its genesis in a series of concerts first staged in 2004. Over four nights Paul Kelly performed, in alphabetical order, one hundred of his songs from the previous three decades. In between songs he told stories about them, and from those little tales grew How to Make Gravy, a memoir like no other. Each of its hundred chapters, also in alphabetical order by song title, consists of lyrics followed by a story, the nature of the latter taking its cue from the former. Some pieces are confessional, some tell Kelly's personal and family history, some take you on a road tour with the band, some form an idiosyncratic history of popular music, some are like small essays, some stand as a kind of how-to of the songwriter's art – from the point of inspiration to writing, honing, collaborating, performing, recording and reworking.

The never, um, ever ending story : life, countdown and everything in between / Ian Molly Meldrum with Jeff Jenkins ; with special thanks to Lawrie Masterson.
In 1974 Ian 'Molly' Meldrum was working as a record producer and music journalist when he was offered the chance to host a new music show called Countdown. It was a show that would run for the next thirteen years and become one of the most-loved and most-watched programs on Australian television. It also turned Molly into a national institution (or 'mental institution' as one of his friends put it). During that period he not only became the most influential voice in Australian music, he endeared himself to millions of viewers with a uniquely unpolished interviewing style and a tangible on-screen passion. For better or worse, whether interviewing Prince Charles or Sid Vicious, Molly was always Molly. Along the way he talked, partied, argued, exchanged blows and became firm friends with a rollcall of the world's greatest musical names. Filled with outrageous anecdotes, an incredible cast of musos, deadbeats, transvestites and international superstars, The Never Ever Ending Story is Molly's hilarious, vivid, warm and always compelling memoir of these incredible years.

Scar Tissue/ Anthony Kiedas
In SCAR TISSUE Anthony Kiedis, charismatic and highly articulate frontman of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, recounts his remarkable life story, and the history of the band itself. Raised in the Midwest, he moved to LA aged eleven to live with his father Blackie, purveyor of pills, pot, and cocaine to the Hollywood elite. After a brief child-acting career, Kiedis dropped out of U.C.L.A. and plunged headfirst into the demimonde of the L.A. underground music scene. He formed the band with three schoolfriends - and found his life's purpose. Crisscrossing the country, the Chili Peppers were musical innovators and influenced a whole generation of musicians.


But there's a price to pay for both success and excess and in SCAR TISSUE, Kiedis writes candidly of the overdose death of his soul mate and band mate, Hillel Slovak, and his own ongoing struggle with an addiction to drugs.

Life/ Keith Richards
With the Rolling Stones, Keith Richards created the riffs, the lyrics and the songs that roused the world, and over four decades he lived the original rock and roll life: taking the chances he wanted, speaking his mind, and making it all work in a way that no one before him had ever done.


Now, at last, the man himself tells us the story of life in the crossfire hurricane. And what a life. Listening obsessively to Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters records as a child in post-war Kent. Learning guitar and forming a band with Mick Jagger and Brian Jones. The Rolling Stones' first fame and success as a bad-boy band. The notorious Redlands drug bust and subsequent series of confrontations with a nervous establishment that led to his enduring image as outlaw and folk hero.

Snakes! Guillotines! Electric Chairs!: My Adventures in the Alice Cooper Group / Dunaway, Dennis
As the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame says: "Before the world heard of KISS, the New York Dolls, Marilyn Manson or Ozzy Osbourne, there was Alice Cooper, the original shock-rock band."

When Alice Cooper became the stuff of legend in the early '70s, their shows were monuments of fun and invention. Riding on a string of hits like "I'm 18" and "School's Out," they became America's highest-grossing act, producing four platinum albums and hitting number one on the U.S. and U.K. charts with Billion Dollar Babies in 1973. Their utterly original performance style and look, known as Shock Rock, was swiftly copied by countless bands. Dennis Dunaway, the bassist and co-songwriter for the band, tells a story just as over-the-top crazy as their (in)famous shows.

Fifty sides of The Beach Boys : the story behind America's greatest band, from the artists themselves / Mark Dillon
Reflecting on the Beach Boys' long, fascinating history, this book tells the story behind 50 of the band's greatest songs from the perspective of group members, collaborators, fellow musicians, and notable fans. It is filled with new interviews with music legends such as Brian Wilson, Mike Love, Alan Jardine, Bruce Johnston, David Marks, Blondie Chaplin, Randy Bachman, Roger McGuinn, John Sebastian, Lyle Lovett, Alice Cooper, and Al Kooper, and commentary from a younger generation such as Matthew Sweet, Carnie Wilson, Daniel Lanois, Cameron Crowe, and Zooey Deschanel. Even hardcore fans will be delighted by the breadth of this musical-history volume. Plans for celebrating the golden anniversary of "America's band" include the long-awaited release of 1967's Smile--the most famous aborted album in rock history--and concerts reuniting the group's five main surviving members. The band's music is as influential as it was 50 years ago, and this retelling of how the iconic rock group found itself in the annals of pop culture couldn't come at a better time.

Cold Chisel are icons of Australian rock. Their 2011 'Light the Nitro' Tour sold more than 280,000 tickets, more than their own 'Last Stand' farewell tour and more than Powderfinger or John Farnham's final tours. They have sold more albums since they first broke up than they did before. Khe Sanh, When the War is Over, Cheap Wine, Choir Girl, Flame Trees, Saturday Night, Forever Now...are songs that are a part of our culture. The book, Wild Colonial Boys details the band's history from their cover band days in Adelaide and their struggle to breakthrough in Sydney through to their US and European tours. Included are the stories behind the songs you know, and the songs you don't. More than 2000 shows are documented along with setlists and reviews. Meticulously compiled from management notes, numerous interviews with every band member, band employees, record company executives, producers and a myriad of other sources, Wild Colonial Boys is, in the words of Cold Chisel manager Rod Willis, 'The Bible on Cold Chisel'

Miles Franklin Award 2015

The Eye of the Sheep by Sofie Laguna is the winner of the Miles Franklin Literary Award 2015!
The Eye Of The Sheep is Laguna's second novel for adults and her first to be shortlisted for the Miles Franklin award. Her first novel One Foot Wrong was long-listed for the award and short-listed for the Prime Minister's Literary Award.
The Miles Franklin Award is presented each year to a novel which "presents Australian life in any of its phases."
Congratulations to all the authors nominated for this prestigious prize.

Told from the mesmerising point of view and in the inimitable voice of Jimmy, this is an extraordinary novel about a poor family who is struggling to cope with a different and difficult child.

Ned was beside me, his messages running easily through him, with space between each one, coming through him like water. He was the go-between, going between the animal kingdom and this one. I watched the waves as they rolled and crashed towards us, one after another, never stopping, always changing. I knew what was making them come, I had been there and I would always know.

Meet Jimmy Flick. He's not like other kids - he's both too fast and too slow. He sees too much, and too little. Jimmy's mother Paula is the only one who can manage him. She teaches him how to count sheep so that he can fall asleep. She holds him tight enough to stop his cells spinning. It is only Paula who can keep Jimmy out of his father's way. But when Jimmy's world falls apart, he has to navigate the unfathomable world on his own, and make things right.

 The shortlist: 

Golden Boys by Sonya Hartnett


The Eye of the Sheep by Sofie Laguna


The Golden Age by Joan London


After Darkness by Christine Piper


Tree Palace by Craig Sherborne